Australia’s ageing population is resulting in more older workers seeking employment in the IT industry. Organisations that take advantage of this trend and engage older workers could gain a competitive edge over other businesses. Furthermore, focusing on candidates and ensuring you understand the skills and experience they offer takes time. For recruiters, investing in solutions that foster operational efficiency can help manage administrative tasks so that candidates can remain the focus.  Age discrimination in the recruitment process As many are aware, Australia’s ageing population is resulting in the nation moving increasingly towards an older workforce. For the IT industry, this can give organisations . . .

Regardless of the scope of your IT industry business, skill shortages could be playing havoc with your development and growth. With demand for IT services only increasing, having the right IT contractors on hand is vital. However, according to a report released earlier this year, recruitment is getting harder and harder. Management advisory company CEB polled 6,000 hiring managers and 900 recruiters to gauge their thoughts on recruitment and analyse the impact of skill shortages on the wider team. One of the main findings to come out of the report was the average fill time. In 2015, employers are waiting . . .

Although sometimes we hate to admit it, technology is one of the core ingredients of business success. While many people still believe that old-fashioned manual data entry is the way to go, these processes are dated and likely to result in errors.  In fact, thanks to technology, simple tasks such as contractor payroll services and salary packaging has never been easier. However, according to a recently released report from PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC), Australian businesses still have much to learn about technology adoption. Collaborating with Google, PwC developed the Small Business: Digital Growth report which not only highlighted the value of technology, but the significant revenue . . .

Regardless of your industry, data and analytics play a critical role in making positive decisions in the workplace. Whether you want to gather some detailed reporting on your contractor workforce hours or analyse your payroll functions, technology is paving the way for these insights. However, while many businesses have the technology to access this information, a recent report highlights that very few have the capability to take any meaningful data of it. KPMG International’s Going Beyond the Data – Turning Data from Insights into Value report surveyed 830 senior business executives across 15 nations. According to the findings, 97 per cent use data and analytic . . .

For all the benefits of technology, there is one problem that will continue to lurk for years to come – cyber security. Whether external cybercriminals or internal hacks, managing information and data security has never been more important. In fact, according to 2014 PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) survey, the number of global cyber security incidents rose an incredible 48 per cent in a 12-month period. These statistics are compounded by PwC stating that the average financial loss from such breaches was a staggering $3.07 million in 2014. However, these figures are global, so it is vital to analyse the thoughts of Australian . . .

The IT industry continues to grow at lightning pace, as a result of advancing technology and businesses moving important data and information onto digital platforms. However, for all the benefits of this trend, Australia – and indeed the world – are seeing significant skill shortages. According to Australia’s Digital Pulse, a report released by Deloitte and the Australian Computer Society, digital technologies now make up 5.1 per cent of the country’s GDP. With more than 600,000 ICT workers already employed across the industry, the report noted that Australia needs at least another 100,000 over the coming six years.  Based on ICT qualification numbers, this . . .

Across many professional services, including recruitment, employees are feeling the effects of higher workloads and are operating longer than contractually obligated. According to the recently released 2015 Hays Salary Guide, 28 per cent of Australian businesses had increased overtime during the last 12 months, while just 11 per cent had decreased this value. Based on the findings, the number of hours that employees were actually working overtime had risen substantially. A total of 11 per cent noted it was more than 10 hours per week, 34 per cent between five and 10 hours, and 33 per cent by five hours . . .

There is no doubt that the digital industry continues to go from strength to strength. However, its progress around the world is hampered by the growing divisions in both skill shortages and gender disparity. This issue was reaffirmed in recently released research from UK IT contracting recruitment firm The Candidate in its ‘Women in Digital’ report. Collecting the responses of 150 digital businesses across the north-west of England, the report highlighted the scope of the male-dominated work landscape and how it was impacting various roles. Gender divide at every level of IT contracting The Candidate discovered that men continue to . . .

As a result of the growing skill shortages and uncertain economy, Australian businesses are slowing their desire to hire new full-time workers.  According to Manpower’s Employment Outlook Survey Q3 2015, the majority (76 per cent) of employers polled aren’t planning on adding to their workforce over the coming three months. In fact, just 12 per cent are in the market for employment – down from 21 per cent in Q2. Lincoln Crawley, Managing Director, ManpowerGroup ANZ, wasn’t surprised by the results, but noted it was still disappointing.  “Australian employers are currently facing a number of challenges, least of all the . . .

Regardless of the industry, a data breach is something that needs to be avoided at all costs. Whether it leads to private candidate information leaking into the public or significant amounts of revenue disappearing, businesses of all shapes and sizes need to understand the risks at play. While a data breach can bring a lot of reputation damage, the financial cost can sometimes be a lot greater. This was the topic of a recently released study titled ‘2015 Cost of Data Breach Study’ from IBM and the Ponemon Institute. The Ponemon Institute polled 350 businesses across 11 countries, including Australia, . . .

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